I’ve been remiss in updating this blog.   I have not been teaching AP US government this year, but a section has been reassigned to me next year, so I’ll begin updating what I have and will post everything that’s original here:

Meanwhile I thought I’d post one idea that I use for AP US history that could easily be adapted to US Government or to AP European:

Students listen to book talks for extra credit.    You’ll find a ton of book talks on C-SPAN’s book TV,  or you can look up othe sources.  Around here (Washington, DC)  we use Politics and Prose, which has its own site and its own You-Tube channel.  I just gave a few samples on the attachment, but on my in-house website, I have many, many  more to choose from.  I try to encourage students to listen to something that’s more or less current to wha they are studying.    Eager students sometimes listen in conjunction to class, and it works exceedingly well to have them comment on a book that is germane to class.

 

Extra Credit Book talks:

I use book talks to boost grades a bit, and to get students in the habit of finding books on line, but they can be used for flpped classes as well, or to supplement a book review…
Questions for book talks:  Use these questions as the basis of an informal, but well-written paper:

Washington, DC where we are based, is a great place for book talks and lectures, so consider that you have the opportunity to   take advantage of the city by attending a lecture or book talk. You can also watch a book talk or panel discussion on C-SPAN or elsewhere. I have a number of possible talks listed. At any time you’re looking for extra credit, if you are using an online talk, try to stay close to the period we’re studying. You get double-credit if you actually attend the book talk  or a panel discussion.
Extra Credit Book talks:

I use book talks to boost grades a bit, and to get students in the habit of finding books on line, but they can be used for flpped classes as well, or to supplement a book review…
Questions for book talks:  Use these questions as the basis of an informal, but well-written paper:

Washington, DC where we are based, is a great place for book talks and lectures, so consider that you have the opportunity to   take advantage of the city by attending a lecture or book talk. You can also watch a book talk or panel discussion on C-SPAN or elsewhere. I have a number of possible talks listed. At any time you’re looking for extra credit, if you are using an online talk, try to stay close to the period we’re studying. You get double-credit if you actually attend the book talk  or a panel discussion.

Write-up the following questions as an essay.
Where did you go?   Or What did you watch?
Date?
What kind of event was it? (Book talk, lecture, and panel…)
Who is the speaker? (*Or who were the speakers…)
What are the speaker’s credentials?
Write up a brief summary of what the speaker or author said:
What stood out for you in terms of what he or she said?
What was new or unusual or contrarian about his or her remarks?
Was there new evidence supporting his/her conclusions?
*If you go to a panel: answer these in a bit less detail for all participants, and comment on the moderator. What role does he or she play? Who was the speaker who stood out for you and why?
Other things to consider:
Who was in the audience? (Gender, age…)
What sorts of questions did the speaker get?
How well did he/she handle the questions?
Were there questions that were more comments (rants!) than questions?
What did you learn from the questions?
Did the talk make you eager to learn more? Can you buy the book?
Or will you look up his or her work?
Why/Why not?
Anything else?

And, you never know who you might run into…

___________________________________________________________________________________________________
If you choose a lecture:  explain who all the signficant speakers are,  what are their credentials, what is their point of view, and what are the main areas in which they disagree?
What did you come away having learned from this lecture?

If you choose a C-SPAN College Class, Give information about the school, the class, the professor and then take and submit notes.   (Ideally Cornell Notes)

Here are some recent ideas for book talks

Adam Hochschild – Spain in Our Hearts: Americans in the Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939

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http://www.wnyc.org/story/american-involvement-spanish-civil-war/

Kissinger by Niall Ferguson

http://www.politics-prose.com/video/kissinger-niall-ferguson

INFAMY by Richard Reeves

Screen Shot 2016-04-23 at 12.04.50 PM.png

http://www.politics-prose.com/video/infamy-richard-reeves

Ira Katznelson Fear Itself: The New Deal and the Origins of Our Time,

http://www.politics-prose.com/video/fear-itself-ira-katznelson

Elaine Showalter’s new book on Julia War Howe

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xe3Eyb7Awc

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Marcia Chatelain on the Great Migration and South Side Girls

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pY5-ke6-y3E

 

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